Saving Mount Everest – Nearing Base Camp

MotionX-GPS: Lukla to Pheriche

MotionX-GPS: Lukla to Pheriche

 

Martin Edström is getting closer to Everest Base Camp. Along the way he is using MotionX-GPS to log his journey and communicate to the world.
View his MotionX-GPS track: Lukla to Pheriche

 

He is documenting the Saving Mount Everest Project, which is being coordinated by the Society for Cooperation Alps-Himalaya.

 

Martin continues to blog from Nepal:
From Thyangboche we have moved on to Pherice, further up the valley at about 4300m. A small, pass-through town, but also an essential acclimatisation stop. From green valleys we are now heading into more barren land, with rock and snow part of every day.

5000m. View over Ama Dablam, as seen from high over Pheriche. Land is getting barren, isolated - and not a place where people care to think about sustainable waste management in between all other high altitude related problems

5000m. View over Ama Dablam, as seen from high over Pheriche. Land is getting barren, isolated - and not a place where people care to think about sustainable waste management in between all other high altitude related problems

 

Bashi Rai, a local porter working for the trekking companies. The porter on the left is carrying a load of 90kg through Pheriche, on his way to Everest Base Camp

Bashi Rai, a local porter working for the trekking companies carrying a load of 90kg through Pheriche, on his way to Everest Base Camp

 

We have done interviews with a couple of the sherpa porters, and as we’ve stayed for two extra days have got a good look at all the trekkers passing by. The Himalayan Rescue Association have their main clinic here in Pheriche, and it’s busy everyday with porters and tourists in trouble because of the high altitude.

 

Yaks and their offspring are seen in every village. They represent part of the region’s future problems; with increasing demand on products to be delivered to tourist lodges and other remote traveler areas, yaks are bred more than ever. With their grazing comes a very used-up landscape, that can’t be sustained in the long term.

 

Yaks and their offspring are seen in every village.

Yaks and their offspring are seen in every village.

 

As for the waste management, this is one typical place where waste and garbage disposal doesn’t come in first hand. Lots is used, especially the water bottles that are thrown away in mass – but in a barren and cold place such as this, few think about sustainability. This is where a project like Saving Mount Everest will have a hard challenge, establishing a waste system where people are least of all concerned with what they throw away.

 

As for our traveling group, we have hit several snags – almost half of the troupe have been evacuated down to Kathmandu by helicopter because of various problems with altitude, and Nepal being a nest of many serious stomach bugs. I was relieved of the latter thanks to the HRA clinic yesterday, who thankfully had antibiotics in stock.

 

Tomorrow we leave for Lobuche, and up towards the snowy regions of Everest Base Camp.

 

Follow Martin’s progress on his blog here: http://martinedstrom.com/category/blog/