LEXINGTON, KY, and SANTA CRUZ, CA, August 14, 2019 – Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (NYSE: TPX), the company synonymous with innovation in the mattress industry, and Fullpower Technologies, Inc., the sleep technology company, today announced a strategic partnership.

“When selecting a technology partner we evaluated all existing options and Fullpower has a clearly superior platform,” said Scott Thompson, Tempur Sealy President and CEO. “We also share a common vision to radically improve customers’ sleep experiences through continued innovation.”

“Tempur Sealy is the best bedding company on the planet,” said Philippe Kahn, Fullpower Technologies Chairman. “Together, we aim to improve lives through better, smarter sleep.”

Through this partnership, Tempur-Pedic recently unveiled the Tempur-Ergo® Smart Base Collection powered by Sleeptracker® AI. The Sleeptracker® AI Platform is designed and operated by Santa Cruz-based Fullpower. Combined with adaptable Tempur-Pedic mattresses, the Tempur-Ergo® Smart Base powered by Sleeptracker® AI creates a completely integrated system with personalized sleep analytics and coaching, plus a uniquely-responsive foundation that can now automatically respond to snoring and may help people sleep more comfortably.*

About Tempur Sealy International, Inc. 
Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (NYSE: TPX) develops, manufactures, and markets mattresses, foundations, pillows and other products. The Company’s products are sold worldwide through third party retailers, its own stores, and online. The Company’s brand portfolio includes many highly recognized brands in the industry, including Tempur®, Tempur-Pedic®, Sealy® featuring Posturepedic® Technology, and Stearns & Foster®. World headquarters for Tempur Sealy International is in Lexington, KY. For more information, visit //www.tempursealy.com or call 800-805-3635.

About Fullpower Technologies Inc. 
Fullpower Technologies designs, develops and operates a complete platform for hybrid Edge/Cloud AI, algorithms, big data, predictive analytics, together with end-to-end engineering services. The Company’s platform is backed by a patent portfolio of 125+ patents. The Company’s key areas of expertise are non-invasive PSG-level sleep technology as well as general activity quantification. The Company’s markets are in Medical, SmartHome and Wearable Solutions. For more information, visit //www.fullpower.com.

*May reduce snoring in otherwise healthy individuals who snore due to body positioning. 

Tempur-Pedic and Tempur-Ergo are registered trademarks of Tempur Sealy International, Inc.

Fullpower and Sleeptracker are trademarks of Fullpower Technologies, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. 

Tempur Sealy International, Inc.

Erin Maratea
Public Relations
859-455-2988
publicrelations@tempursealy.com

Aubrey Moore
Investor Relations
Tempur Sealy International, Inc.
800-805-3635
Investor.relations@tempursealy.com

Fullpower Technologies, Inc.

Tom Lewin
Public Relations
media@fullpower.com

At Fullpower Labs, we were thinking about last week’s Seattle earthquake and doing some geographical distribution analysis. That earthquake hit right in the middle of our night. So many of those Sleeptracker users around Seattle got affected. Here is a graphical representation using the Sleeptracker AI-powered predictive analytics of how that sleep disruption developed.

Fullpower.com – The Sleep Technology Company

Discuss on LinkedIn

Yes, less sunlight means more sleep!

At Fullpower Labs, we looked at the data. The Fullpower dataset includes 250 million nights of sleep. Sleep information from the Sleeeptracker Monitor is unique because it is fully contactless and non-invasive, yet still accurate to within 90%+ gold standard polysomnography. Data shows that continuous heart rate averaged throughout the night is minimized with 7.5 hours of sleep. From there, we find that on average, the answer to our question is 10.8% of deep sleep and 25.3% of REM sleep.

Fullpower.com – The Sleep Technology Company

What is the ideal balance between REM and Deep Sleep?

At Fullpower Labs, we looked at the data. The Fullpower dataset includes 250 million nights of sleep. Sleep information from the Sleeeptracker Monitor is unique because it is fully contactless and non-invasive, yet still accurate to within 90%+ gold standard polysomnography. Data shows that continuous heart rate averaged throughout the night is minimized with 7.5 hours of sleep. From there, we find that on average, the answer to our question is 10.8% of deep sleep and 25.3% of REM sleep.

Fullpower.com – The Sleep Technology Company

This week at Fullpower Labs, we continue to drill down our accurate multi-year data set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We now discovered previously un-identified seasonal patterns correlating continuous Breathe and heart rate over a couple of years. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous breath and heart rate throughout the night.

Seasonal changes occur with higher breath rates in the summer and lower in the winter. This is similar to what was observed in this independent study in Japan

Our AI-powered analytics discovered this new correlation, and found the “inverse” breath correlations which seem to be published in this post for the first time ever as we couldn’t find this science published anywhere! Fascinating power of our long term PSG-grade datasets and tools!

This week at Fullpower Labs, we continue to drill down our accurate multi-year data set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We found some new interesting weekly patterns within the previously identified seasonal patterns. This infographic shows weekly zoomed-in in heart rate. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous heart rate throughout the night.

Seasonal changes occur with lower heart rates in the summer and higher in the winter. This same pattern was also observed in this independent study in Japan. Our AI-powered analytics discovered this independently, and then we found the very interesting Japan paper //lnkd.in/gNpi7ub .

Notice week after week, there is a consistent weekly cycle with lower heart rates early in the week leading to higher heart rates on the weekends and then recovery. Interesting.

At Fullpower Labs, we analyzed our accurate multi-year data-set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We found some interesting seasonal patterns. This infographic shows seasonal changes in heart rate. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous heart rate throughout the night completely non-invasively. Each individual fluctuation in the graph is a weekly max and min, the max being in general weekends (bedtime and wake-time discipline are more lax on weekends) and weekdays with a more disciplined schedule and less “distractions”.


This is what we can observe:

  • Seasonal changes occur with lower heart rates in the summer and higher in the winter.  This same pattern was also observed in this independent study in Japan. Our AI-powered analytics discovered this independently and then we found the very interesting Japan paper.
  • There’s a consistent weekly cycle throughout the year with lower heart rates during the week and higher on the weekends (affected by time to bed, diet, and alcohol).
  • We see a big spike for New Year’s eve (time to bed, diet and alcohol).
  • There’s a significant dip after New Year’s, perhaps due to New Year’s resolutions (better diet, decreased alcohol, more disciplined sleep schedule), but eventually, it fizzles.
  • We see another spike after the Super Bowl.

There was a time not so long ago when people snapped photos and didn’t think about sharing them until much later. But these days, you might consider whether to share a pic before you’ve even taken it. Camera phones have made image transmission almost instantaneous, and it’s radically changed the way people take photographs—and perhaps even the way they live their lives.

“You are much more focused on the question of ‘OK, what do I share?'” says Clément Chéroux, curator of the new exhibit Snap+Share at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. “It’s not about what I’m going to take a photo of to keep as a souvenir. It’s really about what I’m going to share.”

The impulse to share images isn’t new, though. In the late 19th century, postcards detailing the sender’s location and status crisscrossed postal service routes. As photography became accessible, people subjected friends and family to slideshows; later, they hooked their digital cameras up to PCs and created new albums on Facebook. Still, the speed and scale at which we now express this impulse is unprecedented: 3.2 billion pics every day, each uploaded in a moment, many for a public audience. “It’s not only to one recipient,” Chéroux notes. “It’s to thousands.”

You can trace it all back to a photo of someone’s baby. In 1997, software developer Philippe Kahn became the first person to share a cell phone pic when he soldered cables between his Casio digital camera, Toshiba laptop, and Motorola phone to send his newborn daughter’s face to more than 2,000 people. Within three years, camera phones by Sharp, Samsung, and Sanyo were appearing on store shelves—culminating in the iPhone in 2007 and its game-changing apps the next year. Today the audience is never more than a share button away, and life all too easily devolves into a photographic performance fueled by hearts, likes, and comments.

Snap+Share is an ambitious attempt to grapple with these changes. Among the artists included in the show, Erik Kessels tries to visualize the photo glut in his work 24 HRS in Photos, which is exactly what it sounds like—staggering heaps of pictures representing a single day of all the world’s shares. David Horvitz highlights just how quickly even the most pointless of images spread in 241543903. It features memes—made in response to a call Horvitz put out through his Tumblr—of people sticking their heads into freezers, tagged with a number he made up by combining the serial number on his fridge and UPC numbers on some freezer food.

But it’s the taxidermy cat poking out of a hole in the museum’s ceiling—Eva and Franco Mattes’ Ceiling Cat—that looms the biggest. It’s based on a viral meme of a similar cat accompanied by the warning, “Ceiling Cat is watching you.” Chéroux says it’s a metaphor for surveillance: “If the cat is watching us, the internet is watching us.”

Just something to think about as you share your next pic.

Snap+Share runs March 30 through August 4 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Read the original version of this article at Wired.com

//www.wired.com/story/photography-sharing-gallery/

Lewis Painter, Fullpower’s contact at Tech Advisor, posted an excellent review of the Sleeptracker Monitor. It is very thorough, giving praise to the in-depth sleep analysis and customized tips. He even noted that it is the best sleep tracker available right now.

Painter awarded the Sleeptracker 4.5/5 star, noting that it is just a bit pricier than other sleep trackers in his roundup. This “Best Sleep Trackers of 2019” roundup was updated to include the Sleeptracker by Beautyrest at the top of the list – it’s also the only one with a rating and review as it wins. His listed pricing is $195 and shows the immense value of our solution.

See below for links to the review and the roundup.

TechAdvisor
Beautyrest Sleeptracker Review

TechAdvisor
The Best Sleep Tracker 2019

Medical tech allows us to monitor health, get advice and seek care remotely and cheaply.

Barack Obama famously and falsely said, “If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period.” But . . . what if you don’t like your doctor?

Let’s say you, like me, are one of the 20 million Americans who work for themselves—no boss, but also no corporate-tax deduction for health insurance. The smart move is to get a high-deductible insurance plan. Now it suddenly matters what doctors charge: $500 to take your blood pressure and bang your knee with a rubber hammer, $1,200 for a blood test that uses pennies worth of chemicals to tell you your hemoglobin levels are fine. Plus four months to get an appointment, and then the doctor asks you to fax an authorization. What? It’s 2019. It’s time to fire your doctor.

Like roughly half of American adults, I’m borderline: hypertensive, high cholesterol, though only “pre”-diabetic. A streak of misdiagnoses has led me and many others to take doctoring into our own hands. I do an annual blood test for $199 through WellnessFX and get results on a smartphone app. A Bluetooth-connected cuff from Omron Healthcare tracks my blood pressure and even notes atrial fibrillation or irregular heartbeat. A Fitbit scale tracks my weight. Beautyrest Sleeptracker tells me my REM sleep duration. My Apple Watch charts my resting pulse and does a simple electrocardiogram. The more data, the better.

When you do get sick, you still need to see a doctor—they have that prescription pad. But insurance companies tired of overpaying for five-minute doctor visits have begun setting up alternatives. Sutter Health runs walk-in clinics for $129 a visit. Online care is cheaper, so Anthem Blue Cross encourages customers to use LiveHealth, a videoconference platform, for $49. Aetna has a deal with Teladoc, a $4.5 billion public company, for $38 consultations. No pain meds, of course, but almost everything else.

Consumer-driven options have already changed nonvital care. After doing in-home teeth impressions, you can order orthodontic aligners for $80 a month. For acne treatment, you can upload photos of affected areas and receive medicine by mail monthly. Technology is lowering costs and improving care on all fronts.

Technology has moved so fast that several smartphone-based platforms now function like Uber for doctors: Doctor on Demand, PlushCare, Amwell and MeMD are cutting into primary care. These are gig-economy doctors who provide care on demand for, well, gig-economy workers and others without employer insurance coverage. Today I can upload my health stats and connect to my platform of choice 24/7, whereas just recently I could barely get a hold of my doctor by phone, let alone email or texts, because he couldn’t get paid for that time, stuck in a 20th-century pay scheme.

Taking charge of your health care can be complicated and is not for everyone, but it’s doable for most. I’d stick with services that hire doctors from top 25 medical schools. And here’s a warning for hypochondriacs: Consult a real doctor and do not—I repeat, do not—Google your symptoms and convince yourself you have everything from diverticulitis to distomatosis.

If you’re really sick you still need to see a specialist: urologist, gynecologist, gastroenterologist, otolaryngologist, pulmonologist, cardiologist. But by then you’ll have blown through your high deductible, so that’s what insurance is for anyway. And even the specialists will soon realize they can benefit from telemedicine to reduce in-office visits. For now, when you inevitably and repeatedly fill out the prescreening paperwork, specialists always ask for the name of your primary-care physician. I put down “Dr. Webb.”

Doctors don’t scale, so the real future of medicine is digital diagnosis. The best doctor sees one patient at a time, but a clever piece of code can be used by countless people. All the data that patients record is needed for smart artificial-intelligence-based diagnoses. So why not collect more? Current or emerging technologies can enable at-home cholesterol monitoring and better EKGs, easy glucose monitoring, blood tests to find cancer early before symptoms show up, Alzheimer’s screening, thyroid-stimulating hormone tests, even DNA tests that demonstrate a propensity for certain diseases.

Data, data, data—the more the better. As I write this, I have a Fantastic Voyage-like capsule near my stomach transmitting pH levels. How cool is that? As this technology progresses, more tests and more capsules will fill databases with personalized information.

The goal of these measurements isn’t always to give a black-and-white diagnosis saying you have some disease or you don’t, but to build data that can be analyzed over time. As more data is recorded, machine learning will allow programs to detect patterns of known disease progression, and flag them early when treatment is cheap and effective. The revolution is coming. But not from your doctor.